New recipes

Beat the Cold With Alabama Bouillabaisse From the "Best Chef in the South"

Beat the Cold With Alabama Bouillabaisse From the


Freezing temperatures have hit the world — well, seemingly everywhere but California — and it's no secret that when it's chilly, people turn to soup. This filling recipe for Alabama Bouillabaisse may fit the bill perfectly, with tons of hearty vegetables and seafood. Plus, it was created by the 2012 winner of James Beard's Best Chef in the South Award, Chef Chris Hastings (who also happens to be in the All-Clad Chef Ambassador Program, meant to inspire creative and adventurous cooking).

Alabama Bouillabaisse

Servings:12
Prepared In: All-Clad's d5 Stainless-Steel 5 1/2 QT Dutch Oven

Ingredients for Seafood Broth:

  • 12 head-on large hoppers (or large pink shrimp)
  • 12 snapper jowls
  • 6 long, thin strips of orange peel, white pith removed
  • 1 small leek, cut in half and sliced into 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 2 small carrots, peeled and roughly chopped (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 2 celery stalks, roughly chopped
  • 4 Roma tomatoes, crushed
  • 2 large garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 cups roughly chopped fennel fronds
  • 4 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 12 long basil stems, leaves removed
  • 2 quarts vegetable stock
  • 2 teaspoons toasted and ground Spanish saffron

Ingredients for Bouillabaisse:

  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, divided
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/2 cup minced shallots, about 3 shallots
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped garlic, about 4 large cloves
  • 8 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 2 cups cored and thinly sliced fennel bulbs, about 1 bulb
  • 2 cups peeled and thinly sliced carrots, about 2 small carrots
  • 2 cups trimmed and diced celery stalks, about 1/4-inch thick slices
  • 2 cups halved and sliced leeks, about 1/2-inch thick pieces
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, divided
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 6 long, thin strips orange peel, white pith removed
  • 12 littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • 6 Roma tomatoes, blanched, peeled, seeded and quartered
  • 12 (1-ounce) pieces black grouper fillet
  • 4 large stone crab claws, cracked (optional)
  • 6 (2-ounce) pieces of bone-in triggerfish
  • 2 tablespoons minced fennel fronds
  • 1 cup finely chopped basil leaves
  • 1 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 6 fried soft shell crabs (optional)

Directions for Broth:

Peel the shrimp, leaving the heads and last tail segment intact. Set the shrimp aside to use for the bouillabaisse and reserve the shells.

Combine the shrimp shells, and six small strips of orange zest and the next 10 ingredients (from the leeks through to the vegetable stock) in a large, stainless steel saucepan. Bring the broth to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce the heat to low and simmer the stock for 40 minutes.

Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve, discarding the solids. Stir in the saffron and set the broth aside until ready to use.

Directions for Bouillabaisse:

Heat two tablespoons of the butter and six tablespoons of the extra-virgin olive oil in a Dutch oven.

Add the shallots, garlic, and thyme and cook, stirring, for two minutes; do not allow the vegetables to brown. Stir in the sliced fennel, carrots, celery, and leeks. Season the vegetables with 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper.

Add the bay leaves and orange peels and continue cooking for about five minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add the clams and tomato quarters, cover, and cook for two minutes. Stir in the reserved seafood broth, increase the heat to high, cover and cook for three more minutes.

Stir in the shrimp, grouper pieces, stone crab claws (if using) snapper jowls and bone-in triggerfish, cover and cook for a few minutes. Remove the lid and add the remaining two tablespoons of butter, remaining two tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil, chopped fennel fronds, basil, and parsley. Season the liquid with the remaining teaspoon of salt and remaining 1/4 teaspoon of pepper.

Arrange the seafood and vegetables attractively in 12 wide soup bowls and ladle about 1/2 cup of the broth in each bowl (enough to come three-fourths of the way up the sides of the bowls). Top each bowl with 1/2 fried soft shell crab (if using) and one grilled sourdough crouton smeared with several tablespoons of rouille.

Serve immediately.

event_location=###contact_name=###contact_phone=###contact_email=


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


The best places in Alabama for boiled peanuts, the South’s iconic road trip food

Peanuts of all kinds were a constant presence when chef and Food Network Star contestant Martie Duncan was growing up in Alabama. This was in large part thanks to her mother, who was raised in Troy, Alabama, which sits along the co-called Alabama peanut belt.

During the state’s long, hot summers, one way to prepare freshly picked peanuts stands out: boiling them. Duncan still has her mother’s pot for boiled peanuts and recalls vacations where boiled peanuts were the star of the journey.

“I do remember driving to Panama City Beach, Florida, for vacation,” Duncan says. “We would start to look for the best boiled peanut stands once we passed Montgomery and couldn’t wait to get a bag of our own and an ice-cold Coca-Cola for the trip.”

She’s far from alone in the experience. Though boiled peanuts remain a relatively obscure food outside of the South, there’s no denying that they’re the perfect road trip snack.

Boiled peanuts are green or raw peanuts that are cooked in salted water for hours on end. For the unfamiliar, the texture can be surprising: squishy and loaded with whatever flavors were added to the pot. At Alabama Peanut Co. in Birmingham, owner Jaime Thursby describes them to people new to the style as Southern edamame — “when you say it’s a wet peanut that you boil forever, that doesn’t always translate,” he says.

That people in other parts of the US are more familiar with a crop from East Asia than a Southern staple that’s been around for hundreds of years may seem strange, but it works. I’m from California and went to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Auburn is not only where I tried boiled peanuts for the first time, but it’s also the first place I even heard this snack mentioned. It didn’t take long for me to become a fan.

Friends from Alabama, Georgia, and northern Florida introduced me to boiled peanuts on long weekend road trips. We’d pull over at a stand on the side of the road, or choose gas stations where we could pick up a large styrofoam cup of the goobers. The roadside association is a familiar one for people in the South.

“Like so many Alabamians, my memories of boiled peanuts are from taking road trips down to the panhandle as a kid and later Spring Break trips with college friends,” Thursby says. “We would always stop at that stand or old country store on the side of the road as we entered the Wiregrass region of the state. We would typically get just traditional salted but gosh were those things so good. Sometimes they were hot and sometimes cold, we didn’t care.”


Watch the video: Catch and Cook Carp - How to cook carp - carp fishing tips u0026 carp recipe.